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Digital education: Why is it important?

The policymakers in the Rwandan sector have vowed to continue striving to ensure Rwandan students get a world-class education. This was witnessed back in 2016 when the Ministry of Education challenged stakeholders in the education sector to fast track a new model that would revolutionise education, an ‘ICT-in-Education’ policy was adopted. “Smart Classroom”, aimed at digitising education from a paper-based system to a digital-driven sector.

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Teachers and how they shape students

The new national education curriculum called Competence Based Curriculum (CBC), encourages teachers to engage students more in practical and group work in order to build their social skills, and this has enhanced them to be innovative and creative in their day-to-day lives, as this creates an inclusive and collaborative learning environment both in the classroom and outside.

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Transforming education to unleash young people’s potential

Rwanda celebrates International Youth Day this week under the theme “Transforming Education”; it is a time when the world, governments, development actors and communities celebrate young people as a force for positive social change. It is also an opportunity to raise awareness of challenges and problems facing the world’s youth and advocate for accelerated actions to enable their full participation as partners in the social, political and economic development of their societies.

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Gisimba after-school program: Grooming learners for success beyond academics

Children from vulnerable families in Kimisigara and Nyamirambo have an opportunity to explore their talents. They are equipped with life skills that are grooming them for proficiency, thanks to the Gisimba after School Programme Initiative (GASPI). These children are students from primary, secondary and higher learning institutions. They have access to activities such as arts, painting, handicraft, modern music, sports such as basketball, and traditional dance.

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Why it’s important for teachers to keep up with classroom trends

Teachers are knowledgeable when they are fully informed about their profession. However, with modern trends, some have found it hard to keep up with the changing face of how best to manage a classroom or adapt to the radical teaching system. Teachers should learn this in the process of their own teacher training because this is the benchmark of behavioural change, hence knowledge acquisition.

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Strategies to build a productive, positive learning environment for students

A good learning environment matters to students as it boosts their knowledge, thus improving their academic grades and character. This environment is not only created by teachers or heads of schools but by parents and students as well. A positive learning environment is one where optimistic deeds are instilled in learners, such as problem-solving, decision-making, thinking skills, kindness, and treating each other with respect.

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The role of research in boosting education

As far as research among students is concerned, inaccuracy and insufficiency of resources take the lead in gaps intended to restrict the efficiency of research. On the other hand, teachers are also considered among the major beneficiaries of research. This can be highlighted under the fact that there is a big difference between the yield of a teacher who does research and a teacher who doesn’t do research.

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Students need more than ‘classroom interaction’ for academic excellence

Apart from teaching and evaluating students, schools ought to have different platforms that enable students to participate in activities such as public speaking, debates, reading news among others. Students are able to develop a number of core competencies important to their future life, that is; research skills, problem-solving skills, critical thinking skills, creativity and innovation skills.

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Peace Education in Rwandan Secondary Schools: Coping With Contradictory Messages

This research paper explores how peace education in Rwandan secondary schools has faced challenges linked with the content of the programme, its implementers, and the environment in which it has to evolve. Students and teachers demonstrated three possible responses: they accepted the contradictory messages, rejected them, or, in a large number of the cases, articulated an inability to make a clear-cut decision between the curriculum content and the other content contradictory to it.

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A reflection on the need for a language management scheme at the university of Rwanda’s college of education

The issue of language policy and management has been tackled by various scholars worldwide, but gaps are observed in studies that explored the language management schemes in schools, particularly in institutions of higher learning. This paper contributes to filling this gap by reflecting on the need to design a language management scheme for the University of Rwanda’s College of Education to promote language proficiency and quality education.

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Rwandan schools set to receive new textbooks for genocide, peace studies

The new teaching and learning materials fit under the newly revised Competency-Based Curriculum and are expected to help build more peaceful school environment, families, communities and country in general. The books will help teachers to prepare lessons that equip students with critical thinking skills. This will prevent any circumstances that could trigger conflict or lead to atrocities.

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How the youth learn about the country’s history

As Rwanda commemorates the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi, it is important that the youth, especially those born after the Genocide understand what happened. “Being honest about tragedies is important, but remembering that we are talking to children is equally vital. The message of oneness, patriotism, human rights, tolerance, equality and equal opportunities should be deeply emphasized,” a teacher says.

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From Classrooms to Conflict in Rwanda

This book questions the conventional wisdom that education builds peace by exploring the ways in which ordinary schooling can contribute to intergroup conflict. Based on fieldwork and comparative historical analysis of Rwanda, it argues that from the colonial period to the genocide, schooling was a key instrument of the state in contributing to the construction, awareness, collectivization, and inequality of ethnic groups in Rwanda.

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“That Child is Me,” A guide on how to explain Rwanda’s dark past to children

At just 11 years of age, terror befell Claver Irakoze who witnessed the Genocide against the Tutsi. It is the assortment of his past wounds and emotions that stirred the writing of his first book for children, entitled, “That Child is Me,” a book that is aimed at conveying awareness to parents on how best they can package the information of Rwanda’s dark to their children, without traumatizing them.

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FEATURED: Overview of Progress in Education post-1994 Genocide against the Tutsi

The introduction of identity cards by Belgian authorities in 1933, categorically established each individual’s ethnicity, the ID cards were used to identify Tutsi children in classes and discriminate against them when releasing exam results. It facilitated the widespread exclusion of Tutsi from schools and workplaces and were used by genocide perpetrators in 1994 to identify their victims, to the extent that they served as death warrants.

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